Should the leap second give you pause?

Have you ever dreamed of having the power to freeze time? It’s going to happen on June 30th, but only for a second.

 

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The leap second is a one-second adjustment that is occasionally applied to Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) in order to compensate for the Earth's slowing rotation. 25 leap seconds have been added by the International Earth Rotation & Reference Systems Service since 1972, with the last one happening on June 30, 2012. This leap second will be added during business hours at 23:59:60 UTC on June 30, 2015 and will occur simultaneously across the globe.

 

Several mass media reports have raised an alarm that the leap second could cause glitches for web sites and applications. The potential for problems occurs when clocks go from 11:59:59 to 11:59:60, instead of straight to 12:00:00. Looking back, some computer systems did experience technical problems during the last leap second in 2012 due to an issue with how the Linux operating system handled the Network Time Protocol's (NTP) introduction of the extra second.

 

Since then though, Linux has incorporated updates to their system. We’ve also assessed the potential impact and do not expect any systems, including HP ProLiant ServersHP Storage Products and HP Networking Communication to be affected. We’ve previously accommodated small discrepancies in synchronization between system clocks and UTC due to events like Daylight Saving Time and leap years. The upcoming leap second will be handled similarly, without interruption.

 

Time may be standing still for a second, but your business and life will keep moving.

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